My life is a script from a Korean Drama! Part 3

Molly doesn’t live here anymore
Mom didn’t believe that children needed many things, and dad went along whether he agreed or not. “A nice neat simple life”, I remember them constantly saying,” We can’t have the house looking like Romper Room now can we?” I was told from the time I was a small child that it just wasn’t healthy to get attached to material things. Doing so was an outright sin as well as being considered greedy.
The closer it got to my ninth birthday the worse I felt. The pain in my stomach was so bad I was sure that it felt just like someone was stabbing me with a knife. Later I learned that was not what a being stabbed felt like at all but we won’t go into that here. I new that if I were to die at that minute I would go straight to the burning pits of hello for what I was thinking about doing was certainly a huge sin.
The BOX
Every year a week before my birthday my parents would come to my room with a box, I was to put all the gifts from my previous birthday into the box. I would have about an hour to do this chore. After placing everything into the box my parents and I would go over a list of charities that were collecting toys for less fortunate children. Once we had picked one my parents would call and set up an appointment for us to deliver them. I never really minded this family tradition, until my ninth birthday.
Great Grandma La Gra had give Molly to me the previous year. Molly was the perfect friend. She was about 15 inches tall with long straight, dishwater blonde hair. Her skin was like porcelain even though she was made of plastic. He lips where painted a soft pastel shade of pink. Her cheeks were blushed as if she were just kissed by a cool sweet breeze. Molly’s dress was white cotton with little pink roses on it. She wore bobby socks and little white sandals. She was not an expensive doll but Molly was more than just a stupid toy. Molly was my best friend. Oh how I loved Molly, I really didn’t want to put her in the box.

The Big Sin
The box sat outside my bedroom door for a couple of days. I had put a few of my other gifts from the previous year inside the box carefully. Then I hid Molly and when asked about her whereabouts I lied! I told my parents I had not seen here and that I was concerned that she had run away.
After a fifteen minute lecture that seemed more like three hours on the topic of how children today don’t take care of things. I thought I was off the hook and that they would move on. I was so wrong! Dear ol’ mom offered to go help me find the missing doll. My heart dropped all the way to my big toe. I thought for sure I was going to vomit. I can honestly say I don’t think I ever felt so panicked! What does one do when cornered, confess sins or keep mouth shut! Mom would find Molly in minutes and she did! Molly was now in the box and it was time to take the box to the children’s hospital.

I remember thinking on the drive o the hospital that I would rather give a kidney or any other part of my body that someone should use if I could only keep my best friend. But I knew it was pointless to argue. Once we arrived at the hospital I asked if I could give Molly to someone myself. My parents agreed as long as I promised not to pull anything. If I could have donated my parents to charity on that hot summer day in late June , there is not a doubt in my mind that I would have.
I walked from room to room visiting children passing out the items in the box. All that was left was Molly. I walked into a room where there was a girl about my age. She looked scary; I quickly covered Molly’s eyes! Some horrible person had lit her on fire. She was covered with scares; it scared me to look at her. Molly whispered to me to run! That is when the girl looked at me and smiled. It was a gentle smile. When she spoke her voice was soft and scared. She asked. “What is her name?” Molly I replied. Then out of the blue I handed her my best friend and said, “I brought her to keep you company.” She smiled and took her carefully and said, “Why thank you, it has been rather lonely here and with the burns the others say I am scary. “Molly will be a faithful friend,” I told her, “just love her and she will love you back.” and then I ran out of the room. I could not believe I had just given away my best friend. My life was now over I would die from loneliness within the hour.

Well 13 years later, I was still alive; I had not died of loneliness. I was now twenty –two married with a son. Life had gone on. I got an urgent call from my father someone had telephoned him with a message for me. An old classmate was trying to locate me? I wrote the number down but I didn’t remember ever being friends with an Annie Svennson or any Ann for that matter. I stuck the paper with the number in my sweater pocket and went on about my day! Two weeks later my father called again and said, “Please call your friend, she keeps calling here for you.”
Calling people on the phone was never something I liked doing. To make call required a lot of guts! One just never really knows what the person on the other end of the line is going to say. After a few more calls from my dad I finally decided to suck it up and give this girl a call and ask her what the heck is up! Well I dialed the number counting to 10 between dialing each number! Yep, this was back in the days where you actually dialed a phone! One ring, two ring I still had time to hang up, when I heard a man say, “Hello this is Dave Svensson,” I asked to speak with Annie and he said, “you must be Cindy, she was hoping you would call” I explained that I had not been called Cindy since I was a child and that he should call me Cynthia. He said, very well and told me he would go get Annie. There was a silence l and I really wanted to hang up. Then I heard a voice that was vaguely familiar, “Can you meet for lunch?” she asked.
Red Robin at 1:00 they really did make the best burgers, I got there right on time and starving! I told the hostess I was expecting to meet someone. The hostess asked me my name and then she told me my party was waiting for me. As I walked towards the table I stopped short. My feet wouldn’t move. Oh my GOD! There she was, not Annie but Molly! I slowly made my way across the room to the table and stood in amazement and just starred. The hostess handed me a letter. Unable to speak I sat there still and in shock. She looked just like I remembered. How did she find me? I picked her up to look at her and in my state of shock I forgot about the letter.

A few minutes later a waiter stopped and asked if I was ready to order. “Order, order what?” I asked.
I picked up Molly and the letter and went out to my car. I sat starring at the envelope. It was off white with a bit of lace. On the back it had a wax stamp seal. It smelled like Lily of the valley.
I carefully opened the envelope and on the inside was a letter written on a perfumed piece of Victorian style stationary. Dear Cindy, Thank you for sharing your best friend with me when no one else would be my friend. I enjoyed her company and I think she enjoyed mine. I have a husband and my own daughter now so I thought I should return her to you, I noticed many years ago that on the inside of Molly’s dress in dark pencil were the words , if lost please return to Cindy at WA2-4917. Cindy if you want to hear about some of the adventures that Molly and I shared gives me a call at LE7 -1928.
The story of Annie and Molly doesn’t end here. I wanted to hear about the adventures they shared and for three years we were the best of friend. Three years was all we had as Leukemia took Annie away from me. This time the pain was much worse much closer to being stabbed in the stomach and the heart.
To comfort her 5 year old daughter Christina I once again parted with Molly. I told Christina that Molly was an old friend of her moms a great listener and that she would be her friend through thick and thin. Christina was delighted to have a friend that had shared so much of her mom’s life. For a year I spent almost every day with Christina, playing and sharing stories with her that her mom had shared with me. A year was all we had when Leukemia also took Christina.
It’s been 40 years since I started writing all this stuff down. I have found that having friends and spending time with them is the most important gift of all.

When birthdays roll around and I see gifts in boxes I am instantly reminded of the dreaded birthday box and all the friends and family I have lost to Leukemia over the years.

Dressing up

I was invited to attend a historical fundraiser and I decided to make a piece of fun art to fit the theme. Lucky for me, the man I rent my shop from has lots of trash and scraps for me to use. Below are a few photos of the work in progress.

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Today’s Quote
“Let me listen to me and not to them.”
– Gertrude Stein
About Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein, the expatriate American author known for her clever wordplay, was an ardent collector of Cubist art and tried in her stream-of-consciousness prose to capture that immediacy and sense of play. She was born on February 3, 1874 near Pittsburgh and moved to Paris in 1903. She and her partner, Alice B. Toklas, volunteered for hospitals during World War I. In the 1920’s, her salon attracted many great writers and painters; she coined the term Lost Generation for the post-World War I expatriates. She died on July 27, 1946.

If you are driving down Front Street in Issaquah you can spot my first goose in the window of Fischer Meats.
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Today’s Quote
“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Wow !What an Opening!

Our Sky’s The Limit art show opened at Columbia Winery on the 5th of January with our kickoff party on the 8th. The place was packed!
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People were tasting wine and having wonderful conversations!
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Artists were onsite and were giving tours, and art was sold!
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The show is open until March 30,2016,we move out on March 31st!
Between now and then if anyone wants a private tour with a complementary wine tasting just give me a shout!
art@cynthiafreese.com cell 425 533 5973
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Special Thanks to my great group of artists, Margaret Van Duine, Scott Kranz and his wife Jill, Craig Wellbrock,Judy Salas,Ricco DiStefano,Carol Ross,Ken Vensel,Greg Barto & Debbie Drllevich from The Green River Community College Welders. Extra special thanks to all our wonderful guests who made the trek out on cold winter night to support the arts!

Today’s Quote
“A man can do only what he can do. But if he does that each day he can sleep at night and do it again the next day.”
– Albert Schweitzer
About Albert Schweitzer
Albert Schweitzer, the German medical missionary, won the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his humanitarian work at a hospital in French Equatorial Africa, where he treated and operated on thousands of people, including hundreds of people afflicted with leprosy. He was also an organist, famous for his interpretation of J.S. Bach’s music. Late in life, he worked with Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell against nuclear proliferation. He was born in 1875 in Kaysersberg and died in 1965.

“To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.”
– George Orwell
About George Orwell
George Orwell was the pen name of English writer Eric Blair, best known for the satirical Animal Farm and the dystopian 1984. He was born in 1903 in India and raised in England. After school, he joined the Burmese police. He left after five years, disillusioned with colonialism, and lived in poverty while he taught himself to write. Following two rejections for Down and Out in Paris and London, he asked a friend to destroy the manuscript. She gave it to an agent instead, resulting in publication. He died in 1950.

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4 projects finished & a quote!

It was 93 degrees out today and I was working in my shop. My little shop felt like it was 120 degrees inside with the welder going. Susan Gerend has been asking me to build her a bottle tree. I finally got it finished today.

I also finished a few other projects and I am closer to getting a few more completed.

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“The best way to have a good idea is to have lots of ideas.”
– Linus Pauling
About Linus Pauling
American chemist Linus Pauling is the only person ever awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes. He was born in Portland in 1901. He won a Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his breakthrough work on hemoglobins and proteins. He also originated the theory that DNA was formed in a double helix. He became a peace activist after studying fallout from nuclear bombs. His influence and work in concert with other scientists led to a test ban treaty and his second Nobel Prize, for Peace, in 1963. He died in 1994.

The art of spending time with friends & a quote

Today was a lovely day. My friend Laura and I drove over to Prosser to visit friends. Our first stop was the VineHeart Winery to visit my friend Patricia. Upon arriving we found out it was the first day of the cherry harvest! Guess who got some fresh picked cherries.

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Then we went to my friend Sues where we were treated to a lunch for Queens!
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After Lunch Sue got out Lady Bluebird and we went for a spin through town. Yep, Lady Bluebird is a lovely 1963 Thunderbird! IMG_0414

We even took time to hug a large tree!IMG_0420

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We had a fun filled packed day with a variety of friends!

Then on the way home just miles from Laura’s house I was spared from receiving a speeding ticket and just asked to slow down or to pull over and rest. Yikes I was doing 39 in a 25 zone.
Today’s Quote

“The point is not to pay back kindness but to pass it on.”
– Julia Alvarez
About Julia Alvarez
Dominican-American author Julia Alvarez is best known for her novels, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents, about sisters adjusting to life in the US, and In the Time of the Butterflies, the tragic life story of the anti-Trujillo activists, the Mirabal sisters. Born in New York in 1950, she was raised in the Dominican Republic until she was ten, when her family fled the country. She and her husband live in Vermont and run a sustainable coffee farm/literacy center in the Dominican Republic.

a quote , a photo , and two friends healing

At the end of this month it will soon be two years since I caught myself on fire at my work shop. I am still not very comfortable to go there alone. Healing takes some time, the scars are faded but when I turn on my torch I am no longer fearless.
Below is a photo of the shirt I was wearing two years ago in June. It was hot out and I had my leather apron covering a piece of art to protect it from the sparks.

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Instead of working in my shop this past year I have been spending more time with friends. In the below photo: taken this past week, I am with my friend Laura. Just two years ago Laura had a double brain aneurysm and a stroke. She really understands the healing process. She spent a month in intensive care and has had to learn how to do everything from scratch! When I am out with her I find that I am more aware of how clueless people are. They look at her as if she were a normal healthy lady. When we are out together only her and I know how hard she is working to walk the trail with me.

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“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.”
– Beverly Sills
About Beverly Sills
Beverly Sills, the talented American opera coloratura, became an international superstar in 1966 with her performance in Handel’s Guilio Cesare. She was born Belle Miriam Silverman in 1929 in New York. The New York City Opera rejected her repeatedly before they hired her in 1955. She left singing briefly in the 1960’s to devote herself to her young children: One is largely deaf, the other is mentally retarded. After retirement, she took the reins of the New York City Opera, turning it into a viable operation. Sills died of lung cancer in 2007 at the age of 78.

Today’s Quote a note and a short video.

“We live in a fantasy world, a world of illusion. The great task in life is to find reality.”
– Iris Murdoch
About Iris Murdoch
Iris Murdoch, the acclaimed Anglo-Irish author who won a Booker Prize for her novel The Sea, The Sea, about jealousy, love, and loss, was equal parts novelist and philosopher. She was born in 1919 in Dublin. She taught moral philosophy at Oxford for 15 years and wrote the influential book The Sovereignty of Good. Her fiction often used Gothic elements to tell stories with a philosophical theme. She died of Alzheimer’s in 1999. Her life was the subject of the movie Iris, starring Judi Dench.

I took a friend who has had a bit of cabin fever for a short walk this week. We danced to the music made by the rain! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcpjnRy7avI Now I want rain drums in my backyard! ! In this short 1 minute and 50 second video you will see my friend Laura. A year and a half ago Laura suffered two brain aneurysms and a stroke , she has had to teach herself to do pretty much everything over again. From walking to talking to dressing herself and feeding herself.She is nit able to drive or go to work yet however she is painting. Laura likes to send paintings to people who donate $100 to her go fund me campaign.http://www.gofundme.com/saboya

Smoking Crow & Today’s Quote

There was a time in my life that I was a smoker. I am not sure why I started as I knew it wasn’t cool. I am glad I quit.Smoking Crow,acrylic 12 x 12 x .8 $50
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Today’s Quote
“It has been my philosophy of life that difficulties vanish when faced boldly.”
– Isaac Asimov
About Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov, the American author known as one of the top writers of science fiction’s golden age, penned nearly 500 fiction and nonfiction books, including the Foundation trilogy and I, Robot. Born on January 2, 1920 in Russia, he moved to the US with his parents at age three. As a teen, he would read pulp magazines in his parents’ candy store and became inspired to write his own stories. His fiction frames interesting ideas in a bare-bones narrative. He died on April 6, 1992.