Blades Of Change


I have been house sitting for the past few weeks and the property I am watching is filled with amazing art. In talking to the owner Jill Drllevich I asked her about a particular piece and here is her story.

“I was born on January 8th, 1950 in Brooklyn, N.Y. My parents moved shortly after my birth to Long Island. I was raised in a home that encouraged inquisitiveness and experimentation. We were taught that with determination and hard work anything is possible. The worst thing we could possibly say to our dad was;” I can’t”. At the age of 36, with 4 children at her side, my mother went back to college to earn her Master’s in Education. My father, with just a high school diploma, was asked to travel the U.S. teaching Quantum Physics.  

Growing up in New York at that time was an amazing experience. With WWII behind us the American dream was a possibility. We were taught in college about utopias and the endless possibilities of the Utopian world. The TV shows we watched depicted the “perfect family”, FATHER KNOWS BEST, Leave It To Beaver, and The Andy Griffith Show.

Unfortunately world events were not cooperating with these utopian dreams.  President Kennedy was assassinated, the civil rights movement was being met with strong opposition, the fear of a Russian invasion was ever present, the Vietnam War was heavy on all our minds and Nuclear Power was introduced to a world still fearful from the devastation caused by the atomic bomb.

I, like many of my contemporaries, put myself in the middle of it all. I marched for peace, I participated in “sit-ins”, and I protested the building of a nuclear power plant in our own small community. Rallies were being held on what seems like a weekly basis to protest the building of a local nuclear power plant in Shoreham, N.Y.  Some protestors even burned their electric bills. I was always taught to follow my heart so, I didn’t just burn my bill, I shut my electricity off, For four years , while raising two small children.. In the end the protestors won due to the fact that there was no viable evacuation route in case of a meltdown or some other nuclear disaster.

With a true pioneering spirit I moved my family to Washington State in the mid-eighties.  

It seems that at the same time I was protesting the proposed construction of the Shoreham Nuclear power Plant, Washington State residents were duking it out over the construction of two new power plants to be an addition to the existing Hanford Nuclear reactor. As with Shoreham, these plants were never completed. As a result there was an enormous amount of structural waste. All of the fan blades that were to be used in the cooling towers of the Satsop Nuclear plant were scrapped and sent to a recycler in Tacoma.

The rest of the story begins here. I bought all the fan blades and their wooden carriers with the dream of turning them into life changing; interactive moving sculptures powered by the many forms of natural energy. My vision and hope is to invite artists and sages from diverse cultures to come together with words and imagination that will promote reflection and introspection, to then turn these blades into sculptures that inspire and empower. I envision them traveling to the many people and places on Earth that have been scarred by the misuse of this mighty power. I see the project almost like “turning weapons into ploughshares”.

These blades stand about 5 feet tall and are hollow inside which allows the artist to carve away pieces of the blade so that they can turn and spin and move as one. My mind is filled to the brim with ideas. Now I need artists to create, thinkers to paint words of wisdom, promoters, managers, writers, investors and anyone else that can see the need to heal and encourage stewardship and sustainability of this precious planet.

This is an evolving ongoing multi-faceted project that was highlighted at the 2018 Seattle Design Fair under the name, POWER OF TRUST  ”

As I sit in the porch swing in Jill’s front the yard and I look at the beautiful blade she has here I am trying to think of a way to help make her dream come true. I have included some photos of how these blades would look in different settings.

If you know of anyone who would like to be a part of the Blades of Change project please send me an email to evergirlart@gmail.com


 

Next

February is a new month and the beginning of a new chapter of my life. In trying to figure out what I should do next I asked myself this question. “If you were told tomorrow that you only had two years left to live what would you want to do in the time you have left? ” Asking the question is the easy part. Being honest in the answers is the tough part.

I have always wanted to give a recital. I had to leave the Cello in Austin and decided that the move to Washington was a time for change so I never gave a recital but I started a company and after a few years decided to focus on art. I had a gallery for a few years. I created when it felt right. Hiking and gardening have been favorite ways to spend my time.

“What would I want to do with my time if I knew I just had two years left? ” Would I spend 18 months trying to figure it out? Would I take off on a cross country road trip by car, or bike or on foot? Would I want to learn something new?

I have a few people I would want to spend time with. I want to sit at there kitchen table and share a cup of coffee with them. I want to talk to there children and learn about there culture. I want to smile and laugh . I want to share myself and love. I want to chat with strangers , I want to enjoy the time I have alone and the time I have with others

February 2019 I am taking a journey , I am traveling deep into myself to explore the unknown and to try to decide what I would really do if I had just two years to live.

a walk in the garden

As I walk around my garden I find little things that make me smile. Sometimes it is a blooming flower, a fancy spiderweb ,a bug or a bird, a squirrel or a fallen branch that looks like a mystical creature. Today on my walk this little metal dragonfly caught my attention.

Today’s Quote

“Instinct is the nose of the mind.”
– Delphine Gay de Girardin

About Delphine Gay de Girardin

French writer Delphine Gay de Girardin was equally well known for her patriotic poetry and for the brilliant literary gatherings at her home. She was born in France on January 24, 1804; her mother was the well-known author Sophie Gay. Delphine called herself the “Muse of the Nation” for her poetry about France. Under the pseudonym Vicomte Charles de Launay, she wrote a gossip column with comedic sketches of Parisian life. She died on June 29, 1855.

A memory and a quote

While I was cleaning up the kitchen today I was thinking about childhood memories and wondering what a typical person thinks about when they remember their childhood? 

A memory came to mind, I was in 5th  grade excited that the campfire  girls meeting was going to be at my house. My mom  loved to bake and I was excited to see what type of  after school  snack she had dreamed up. On arriving home I found my mom , sitting in the corner  covered in  blood, crying,  wrists slit and  blood on the  walls as if she was painting with her own  blood. She had  smeared her blood all over the  living room wall. I  had my little sisters  and the campfire girls  go outside and  play while I cleaned the walls and sent for help. I had to have my  mom  admitted into  Puget  Sound Mental hospital and my great Grandmother  Mable  came to stay with us for a few weeks. 

So many things I have  kept to myself over the years and  little  by little I  share  the things that have molded me into the  person I am today. 

“Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.”– Marie Curie

About Marie Curie

star gazing 24 x 24

Marie Curie, the pioneering Polish-born French chemist, was the first person to win Nobel Prizes in two different fields. She was born in Warsaw on November 7, 1867. No Polish school would admit a woman, so she worked as a governess, sending her sister through medical school in France. Her sister, in turn, sent her to the Sorbonne, where she met her husband, Pierre Curie. Together they studied radiology, discovering two new chemical elements and inventing the term “radioactivity.” She died on July 4, 1934.

star gazing

birdbaths & today’s quote

As spring approaches I have been back in the workshop. I am currently making some fun bird baths & bottle trees. Yesterday I was hoping to work on bottle trees but realized I was out of rebar so instead I got these two started.

I touched up the paint on the green tractor seat and the blue seat still needs to be welded to the base and touched up.

The paint on my wall was done byan 8 year old visitor.

“Trust your own instinct. Your mistakes might as well be your own instead of someone else’s.”
– Billy Wilder
About Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder, the Austrian-American film director who gave us classic films like the farcical Some Like It Hot and the sardonic Sunset Boulevard, was a true rags-to-riches success story. Born on June 22, 1906 in the Austria-Hungarian empire, he fled the Nazi regime in 1934, arriving in Los Angeles with $11 and speaking almost no English. By the 1950’s, he had become one of Hollywood’s greatest directors, directing more than 60 films. He won six Oscars and the National Medal of Honor. He died on March 27, 2002.

ghost in a borrowed dress

Discover the past was the Issaquah History Museums fundraiser. I had an idea to create a dress for the event. With the help of Brad Isley and shelly Vollstedt, my vision came to life. Created entirely out of trash this was a rewarding and fun piece to create.

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Photos by Tracee J Fullum

Dressing up

I was invited to attend a historical fundraiser and I decided to make a piece of fun art to fit the theme. Lucky for me, the man I rent my shop from has lots of trash and scraps for me to use. Below are a few photos of the work in progress.

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Today’s Quote
“Let me listen to me and not to them.”
– Gertrude Stein
About Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein, the expatriate American author known for her clever wordplay, was an ardent collector of Cubist art and tried in her stream-of-consciousness prose to capture that immediacy and sense of play. She was born on February 3, 1874 near Pittsburgh and moved to Paris in 1903. She and her partner, Alice B. Toklas, volunteered for hospitals during World War I. In the 1920’s, her salon attracted many great writers and painters; she coined the term Lost Generation for the post-World War I expatriates. She died on July 27, 1946.

fun with horseshoes & today’s quote

The benefit of being laid off from my day job is that I have been spending more time in my shop. I have a half dozen or so unfinished projects that I am working my way back too. While working on large projects I often work on a small project so that I can enjoy the feeling of completing something!

Crosses range in price from $200-$80 depending on size and design. Small crosses are approximately 25 x 21 inches and larger crosses are approximately 30 x 21 these are fine for indoor or outdoor art.

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Stay tuned for more of my fun with horseshoe series!

Trust your own instinct. Your mistakes might as well be your own instead of someone else’s.”
– Billy Wilder
About Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder, the Austrian-American film director who gave us classic films like the farcical Some Like It Hot and the sardonic Sunset Boulevard, was a true rags-to-riches success story. Born on June 22, 1906 in the Austria-Hungarian empire, he fled the Nazi regime in 1934, arriving in Los Angeles with $11 and speaking almost no English. By the 1950’s, he had become one of Hollywood’s greatest directors, directing more than 60 films. He won six Oscars and the National Medal of Honor. He died on March 27, 2002.

Garden of Chaos

It was a lovely day to be at the workshop today. Since the weather was so nice instead of working inside the shop I pulled a few things outside to work. I think that this is my new favorite piece of work in this series. 4-5-16 1594-5-16 152
I can hardly wait to get the lights inside! Only $850

Today’s Quote
“Hope is not a dream, but a way of making dreams become reality.”
– Cardinal Leon Joseph Suenens
About Cardinal Leon Joseph Suenens
Cardinal Leon Joseph Suenens played a major leadership role during the Second Vatican Council in the early 1960s; his reforms include reciting the liturgy in modern languages, expanding the role of laypersons, and opening a dialogue with other religions. He was born in 1904 in Brussels. Wealthy relatives wanted him to study economics and manage their fortune, but instead he entered the priesthood. He was witty and charming, with an enthusiasm for soccer. He died in May 1996.